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Where in the World? Mapmaking at the Asia-Pacific Margin, 1600-1900 | Entering Asia

Apr 6 2015
Kären Wigen, Frances & Charles Field Professor, Department of History, Stanford University, is part of this years Edwin O. Reischauer lectures at Harvard University.
 
Date: Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 4:15pm to 6:00pm
 
Location: Tsai Auditorium (S010) | CGIS South | 1730 Cambridge Street | Cambridge, MA
 
Title: Where in the World? Mapmaking at the Asia-Pacific Margin, 1600-1900
 
Description: During the early modern era, when cartography in much of the world was converging on a global norm, mapmaking in the Sinosphere moved to its own distinctive regional rhythms. The Qing, Chosŏn, and Tokugawa regimes alike eagerly mapped their own territories, yet restricted the flow of cartographic information from abroad. At the same time, educated publics across East Asia were hungry to know more about the shape of the world beyond their shores. How did mapmaking develop in these conditions? And how did the resulting maps orient their viewers to the wider world? Drawing chiefly on Japanese examples, but with reference to the broader East Asian world, these talks highlight three developments: the representation of oceans, the cartography of continents, and the mapping of the past.