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Ana Raquel Minian

Headshot of Ana Raquel Minian

Ana Raquel Minian

Associate Professor of History
Field: 
Latin America
Transnational, International, and Global History
United States
Ph.D., Yale University
M.A., Yale University
B.A., University of Chicago

Ana Raquel Minian is an Associate Professor in the Department of History. She recieved her PhD in American Studies from Yale University. At Stanford University, Minian offers classes on Latinx history, immigration, histories of incarceration and detention, and modern Mexican history.

Her first book, Undocumented Lives: The Untold Story of Mexican Migration (Harvard University Press, 2018) received the David Montgomery Award for the best book in labor and working-class history, given jointly by the Organization of American Historians and the Labor and Working-Class History Association; the Immigration and Ethnic History Society’s Theodore Saloutos Book Award for an early career scholar’s work in immigration and ethnic history; the Western Association of Women Historians’ Frances Richardson Keller-Sierra Prize for best monograph in the field of history by a member; the Association for Humanist Sociology’s Betty and Alfred McClung Lee Book Award for best book in humanist sociology; and the Americo Paredes Book Award for Non-Fiction presented by the Center for Mexican American Studies at South Texas College. It was also a finalist for the Frederick Jackson Turner Award, given to the author of a first scholarly book dealing with some aspect of American history by the Organization of American Historians and received an honorable mention for the Latin American Studies Association’s Bryce Wood Book Award given to an outstanding book on Latin America in the social sciences and humanities published in English.

Additionally, Minian has published artilces in the Journal of American History, American Quarterly, and American Historical Review. 

In 2020, Minian was awarded with the prestigious Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, which "awards $200,000 fellowships to exceptional scholars, journalists, and public intellectuals."

Minian's second book project, "No Man’s Lands: A New History of Immigration Restriction," examines how during the late Cold War and its aftermath, U.S. officials created new spaces and territories designed to prevent Latin American and Spanish-speaking Caribbean migrants from entering the United States. Rather than a thought-out and coherent project, these various spatial enterprises were designed haphazardly in response to particular incidents and migrations.

Minian is also writing a history about immigration detention in the United States.

Prospective graduate students: if you are interested in working with me please apply to the field of Latin American history rather than U.S. history! You can then do a a Latin American, U.S., or transnational project if you so desire and work with all the other U.S. faculty but I only look at applications in Latin American history.  

Selected Publications & Projects

Ana Raquel Minian
In the 1970s the Mexican government acted to alleviate rural unemployment by supporting the migration of able-bodied men. Millions crossed into the...

Selected Journals & Book Chapters

Ana Raquel Minian
During the late Cold War, the United States and Western European countries offshored migration control to less powerful nations by converting them...
Ana Raquel Minian
De Terruno a Terruno: Reimagining Belonging through the Creation of Hometown Associations
Utilizing a transnational lens, Ana Raquel...
Ana Raquel Minian
“‘Indiscriminate and Shameless Sex’: The Strategic Deployment of Sexuality by the United Farm Workers,” American Quarterly, (Vol. 65, No. 1: March...
Ana Raquel Minian
“Western Hemisphere Act,” in Anti-Immigration in the United States: A Historical Encyclopedia, edited by Kathleen Arnold (Westport, CT: Greenwood...

More Information

Forthcoming

Behind Bars: The History of Immigration Detention (book manuscript in progress)

 No Man’s Lands: North American Migration and the Remaking of Peoples and Places (Book Manuscript in progress)