Recent News

Supporters of gun control and firearm safety measures hold a protest rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as it hears oral arguments in State Rifle and Pistol v...

Amid a continuing spate of mass shootings across the United States, and as House bills addressing gun violence languish in the Senate, U.S. President Joe Biden announced, as a starting point for action, executive orders addressing the…

Amalia Kessler(Image credit: Courtesy Stanford Law School)

Amalia D. Kessler is the Lewis Talbot and Nadine Hearn Shelton Professor in International Legal Studies at Stanford Law School. Kessler’s research focuses on the evolution of commercial law and civil procedure, particularly the roots of modern…

When Stanford historian Steven Press was trying to unearth hidden narratives about Germany’s colonial activities in Southwest Africa’s highly secretive diamond industry, he pursued that age-old maxim to “follow the money.”

Chasing that…

Our inaugural Louise Bourgeois Essay Prize for a research essay by a Stanford Masters or early PhD level student in Humanities, Arts or Social Sciences goes to Sonya Schoenberger for Law, Empire and Radioactive Risk: Landscapes of Rights and…

The Walter J. Gores Award recognizes undergraduate and graduate teaching excellence. This year’s winners are Samer Al-Saber, Aditya Grover, Allyson Hobbs and Paul Nauert.

 

Allyson Hobbs, an associate professor of history in the School…

Gabrielle Hecht sees the world differently from most of us.

 

The Stanton Foundation Professor in Nuclear Security, she reviewed the standard story of nuclear weapons – that they divide the world into haves and have-nots, countries with…

Photo Credit: Steve Castillo

America is closer to a collapse of its democracy than much of the country may realize, according to several experts interviewed by NBCLX in the months following the insurrection in Washington on Jan. 6.

The Historian: Liberal Arts Can…

NAVIGATING UNCERTAIN TIMES, it is tempting, and helpful, to search the past for precedents that might help guide understanding and action — inevitably with the risk of drawing false equivalences. Comparing Trumpism to 1930s fascism, especially,…

Russian tourists visit Ayasofya-i Kebir Camii or Hagia Sophia Grand Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey, January 29, 2021. Murad 

Sezer/Reuters

On July 24, 2020, the Turkish government opened Hagia Sophia in Istanbul to prayer for the first time in 86 years, reverting the building’s status from museum back to mosque.

The Hagia Sophia, built between 534 and 537,…

Radiolab’s Latif Nasser is stunned to find he shares his name with detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. This man was cleared to leave Gitmo in 2016, so why is he still stuck there?